Book

Date: 15 Mar 2018
Doors open: 18:00
Start time: 18:30
Where: Edinburgh
Venue: 69 Morrison St
Edinburgh

EH3 8BW

Members: FREE
Non-members: £10.00

7 (ish) Considerations for Business Analysis Communities of Practice

Different organisations like to arrange themselves in different ways – some organisations have a formal reporting line for their Business Analysis teams, others rely on much looser connectivity to bring together like-minded practitioners.

Communities of Practice are a popular way of bringing together a group of people who share a craft or a profession. They can evolve organically over time or they can be created on purpose to bring together a community with a common interest. They can be aligned to formal reporting structures or go across organisational boundaries.

At this presentation we will explore 7 (ish) elements that it’s important to think about when setting up, developing or growing a Business Analysis Community of Practice.

We will look at:

  • The domain that brings practitioners together

  • The people in the community

  • The shared tools, techniques and resources

  • The culture within the community

  • What does it mean to belong to a community of practice?

  • Sharing & learning

  • What value do communities of practice bring?

 

Vicky has been a Business Analyst for over 15 years. She started as a programmer on big old mainframe IT systems.  She soon realised that working with people was far more interesting than working with lines of code and after getting a taste of analysis on a data modelling course, managed to move into a BA role.

As a BA she has worked in a range of industries including Life and Pensions, Insurance, Banking, Pharmaceuticals and IT Consultancy. She has written requirements, introduced new methodologies to customers, designed and set up BA Practices and trained hundreds of fellow BAs.

She established Be Positive twelve years ago as a way to continue focusing on Business Analysis and developing the BA profession.  She still has a secret hankering for data modelling, though, and gets very excited about opportunities to sketch out the occasional class diagram.



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